Vote!

If you are an Irish citizen over the age of 18 and your name is listed on the Register of Electors, you are entitled to vote. You will vote in a polling station near the address that appears beside your name in the Register of Electors. You are not automatically added to the Register, so it is important to make sure you are listed.

You can see our handy guide to getting set up on the register below. Please share – it’s important everyone has a say this October!

Vote

Our simple guide to getting registered!

Check the Register

Checking if you are on the Register of Electors
is just a click away at checktheregister.ie.

Select your province, then the City or County Council area that you live in and click ‘submit’. You will then be asked to fill in your address and name. If you are on the Register of Electors, then your details will show up – check these are correct.

 

Not on the Register?

Then you will need to apply to be included. This is also pretty straightforward. Download and print form RFA 2.

This form requires details about your name, address and citizenship. Please read the notes carefully. The final section must be signed in the presence of a member of An Garda Síochána, usually at your local Garda Station. You should bring ID, so they can confirm your identity (passport, drivers licence, etc.).

The form must be posted to your local authority (i.e. County Council or City Council). A list of addresses for local authorities is available here. The deadline for receipt of this form to be processed is 17 September 2013, so don’t delay – do it today.

 

Wrong address?

If you are listed at a different address to where you live now, you should change it, as you will not receive your polling card and it may be more difficult to get to your polling station. Have you moved house since the last election. Are you a student living away from home, who will be unable to return home on 4 October to vote in the referendum?

Download and print for RFA 3.

This form also requires details about your name, previous and current address, as well as citizenship. Please read the notes carefully. The final section must be signed in the presence of a member of An Garda Síochána, usually at your local Garda Station. You should bring ID, so they can confirm your identity (passport, drivers licence, etc.).

This form must be posted to the Local Authority where your old address was. (A list of addresses for local authorities is available here) They will remove your name from your old address and forward the details to your new local authority (if necessary). This may take longer, so although the deadline is still 17 September 2013, it is worthwhile getting this done quickly.

On voting day!

You should be sent a polling card shortly before the Referendum telling you which polling station to attend on the day. The polling hours will be announced in the media closer to the date, but are generally from early in the morning until late at night, so you should have plenty of time to vote.

You do not need a polling card to vote, if this does not arrive, you can still present yourself at your polling station (usually a local school). Bring ID, as you may be asked to prove you are who you say you are.

It is a private ballot. You will be given a ballot paper with the title of the Bill printed on it and asked if you approve or not. Mark yes or no. Details of the Bill will be posted in the voting booth. It takes ten minutes.

Postal Votes

The use of a postal vote is very limited in Ireland, generally only to Government officials overseas on State business and their spouses, and some people who are unable to attend a polling station for medical or occupational reasons. For more information on this topic, see here.

Can’t vote?

  • No one under the age of 18 can vote in a Constitutional Referendum, neither can non-Irish citizens, including EU nationals, even if resident in the Republic for a long time. These people may be entitled to vote in Dáil elections (British citizens only) as well as Local and European elections (legally resident non-Irish citizens who are on the Register of Electors).
  • Irish citizens who live overseas have no right to vote on this referendum.
  • Irish citizens resident in Northern Ireland are not on the Register of Electors and have no vote in this referendum.
  • Some of these who are graduates of Trinity College or the National University of Ireland do have the right to vote on the Universities Panel of Seanad Éireann.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>